Health

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I'm of the same thinking, but that's a luxury you know? I highly doubt those without any water would care, even if it is substandard. I'd feel like an **** debating it.

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ForkNdaRoad 2 months ago

I have heard that as well, that if we only drank distilled water, we would be worse off.

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Logan 2 months ago

New York City has some of the best tap water in the country so thee's no reason for me to drink bottled water at home or to use a filter.

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Linnster 2 months ago

Have you ever tried RO (reverse osmosis) water?

Tip to the wise, don't bother.......

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AliceD 2 months ago

In response to “Have you ever tried RO (reverse osmosis)...

Yup RO is the same thing. It’s like stripping all your food of every nutrient.

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DW2 2 months ago

But we don't need the fluoride in our digestive systems. All water tastes different.

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Vrendowl 2 months ago

In response to “But we don't need the fluoride in our...

Not the digestive system but it does wonders for your enamel.

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Sunny_the_skeptic 2 months ago

In western nations, there is no reason not to drink tap water as-is. It's perfectly safe to drink, so water filters, and bottled water are just a scam.

The only reason I can think of to run it through a filter is to remove the chlorine taste that some tap water has, but even then, if you drink enough of it, you don't notice the taste anymore.

I used to own a Brita pitcher, but the filters were getting expensive. I bought it to remove the chlorine taste, and it did work well for that, but then I got too used to it and unfiltered water tasted like I just poured myself a glass of Clorox, even when I used it in food, drinks, ice cubes, etc.

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Thedudeyouhatetomeet 2 months ago

That's true, sort of, but the water here might be pink, brown, or black, and it stinks, and I don't appreciate the ring in my toilet even when the water is clear, so I use a whole house water filter. I also put vinegar in the toilet after each flush to block scale formation.

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that_guy 2 months ago

That's not a secret. Ever tried having a fish tank with pure water in it? Yeah... A completely booked weekend for the nearest fish cemetary, a.k.a toilet flushing sessions.

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ZonkeyBalls 2 months ago

Heavy water is even worse... Not that I admit anything, but I wouldn't let my shark anywhere near that place.

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ZonkeyBalls 2 months ago

I've been using Brita and Pur pitchers for years, and it's an improvement of the water we have on tap. I just cannot drink water from it as is. Some places here in Pennsylvania have really good tap water in the mountainside and countryside, but not so much in some small towns or even the cities like Allentown. I just use purified water with coffee or drinking it normally as is, or with cooking, though I'll also use tap with that as well. In some cases, either or turns out better, but I've gotten better results with purified.

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Tanor_Faux 2 months ago

In response to “I've been using Brita and Pur pitchers for...

I agree, some places just have bad/questionable water. Since moving to Pennsylvania, I've had more acid in my water than I'm used too, and never had elsewhere.

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Zolfie 2 months ago

In response to “I agree, some places just have...

Where in PA? I'm out in the Poconos, but some of these small towns have antiquated pipe systems that probably haven't been treated or worked on for years. If we're too poor to fix the roads and bridges, then I doubt fixing the gas lines and water pipes is too much to ask for?A

Yeah the water in my housing unit seems to have this salty, acid taste to it. Like, sometimes it feels spicy, but it's the chlorine and whatever my town uses in the water system. I guess whatever ends up in our water supply ends into the Lehigh River and that doesn't seem too good either around here. Even if you boiled it first.

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Tanor_Faux 2 months ago

In response to “Where in PA? I'm out in the Poconos, but some...

Close to Maryland... yeah, you never know how long it's been since people have worked on that stuff. I think we have a newer system here, but it's a small system and I don't think it's treated or anything (or not treated much if it is).

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Zolfie 2 months ago

Everything in moderation, that's how it is. If you lack minerals your body will have some serious imbalance with transportation since concentration of minerals can control how much of what does a cell take, but have too much and they could solidify somewhere they shouldn't.

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Sunny_the_skeptic 2 months ago

I have well water and drink/use it from the tap with all the iron and other minerals in it. If I had city water, however, I'd be using a filtering system to remove the flouride, chlorine, etc. and add trace minerals to the filtered water used for drinking and cooking, or I'd haul jugs filled from a friend's well, as I did when I lived in the city. Bottled water can be anything from mineral water from the ground to municipal water with a fancy price tag.

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Bozette 2 months ago

The only thing I want filtered out is the chlorine and pharmaceuticals.

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trooper 2 months ago

No thanks.
I'll continue to use bottled/filtered water and add vitamin supplements.
There are plenty of other things in water that you DON'T want - even if the water goes through a public treatment system.

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Walt_OReagun 2 months ago

In my own experience, you can not get straight information about water. No matter where you search you are going to end up talking to a water softener salesman. He won't tell you anything without first testing your water.

PSA: A water softener removes calcium and magnesium and replaces them with sodium, which causes heart attacks. If you have a softener, don't drink the water.

Bottom line: if you are getting well water, you probably need filters. For any other source, maybe you do and maybe you don't.

Water filters are made in four standard sizes and a lot of dealers will not even tell you what size they are trying to sell you. Some companies offer proprietary systems and they will not tell you how those differ from the standard filters that cost one fourth the price. I studied this for 2 1/2 years before I found a dealer that revealed actual measurements of their filters: particle size, flow rate, and pressure drop. That was Aquaboon at amazon.com and I bought the "Big Blue" filter. Five micron was the only particle size rating available. A five micron filter will stop most dirt and metal particles, but you need a one micron filter to stop bacteria.

A filter will not remove dissolved material, which usually means calcium and magnesium but also includes stinky gases. A carbon filter removes gases but not calcium or magnesium. Magnesium joins with soap to leave a ring in your tub. Calcium and magnesium both form scale when heated. If there is a lot, you will get a ring around your coffee cup, and at that point you get a Reverse Osmosis (RO) system. That gives you pure water, and you can still get your dietary needs of calcium and magnesium from your tap water.

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that_guy 2 months ago

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